The School District of Philadelphia
Office of Communications
440 N. Broad Street, Suite 301~Philadelphia, PA 19130-4015~(215)400-4040

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Megan Lello
215-400-6887



02/01/2017

SCHOOL DISTRICT STEM STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT AFRICAN-AMERICAN TECHNOLOGY INNOVATORS IN HIDDEN FIGURES

Area DuPont and Deloitte Employees Donate Over $13,000 in Tickets to Students

PHILADELPHIA – Approximately 1,165 students in The School District of Philadelphia have been provided the opportunity to see the Academy Award-nominated film Hidden Figures, thanks to a donation of over $13,000 from a group of Philadelphia-based employees from DuPont and Deloitte. The positive experience allowed students to learn about the contributions of African-American innovators as schools across the city celebrate Black History Month.

Students studying STEM and related subjects at Science Leadership Academy, Science Leadership Academy at Beeber, and Science Leadership Academy Middle School were able to see the film at theaters throughout the city free of charge. They were provided a promotional code and web link to download tickets.

“All of us at the Science Leadership Academies are so thrilled and thankful for the donation of the Hidden Figures movie tickets,” said Chris Lehmann, Assistant Superintendent of the Innovation Network and Co-Principal of Science Leadership Academy. “Hidden Figures is an important movie that speaks powerfully to the intersection of issues of racial and gender justice and STEM education that factor heavily into the SLA educational experience. We know this will be a powerful experience for all our children.”

Hidden Figures, featuring actresses Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monae, highlights the achievements of African-American mathematicians and computer scientists in the 1960s. The film tells the story of Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson, three African-American women employed at NASA whose work was critical in launching astronaut John Glenn into orbit.

“We feel it is important for young African-Americans and students of all backgrounds to know the history lessons that are so often lost or glossed over,” said Lydia Mallett, DuPont executive. “We hope sharing true inspirational stories in a movie that is also entertaining allows the students to expand their dreams and broaden what they see as possible for themselves as individuals.”

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